dontvisitmyintentions

dontvisitmyintentions wrote

The way we learn to become adults is by learning to think. Stifling speech prevents individuals from engaging in dialog that may lead them to learn to think through problems. Stifling free speech leads to anger, an emotion that blocks rational thought and encourages petty little people to remain children.

Very paternalistic. The author allows for no righteous anger and no resentment. There is only the argument against misinformation, just like the mainstream liars make. It's false.

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dontvisitmyintentions wrote

Decentralization by means of replication eliminates the power to control that data entirely, in exchange for dissemination. The way to distance yourself from your posts is the same as on an image board: create a new pseudonymous persona, or maintain no persona at all.

In federated systems, nodes rely less on local stores, so deleting data from a node may work better. It helps make Mastodon/Pleroma confusing and fragmented because instances capriciously block other nodes and users without any signal that's happening. The result is users subscribe to multiple nodes lest their conversions be mangled by getting muted by third parties.

Federated systems could be more friendly and work with users' idea of privacy, but that requires them not to abuse the powers which they abuse now. There's no future for it in wide-spread society, and any smaller group you trust to not abuse it, you can also trust to not abuse your posts.

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dontvisitmyintentions OP wrote

That book looks interesting, thanks. The Natural Building Blog site (whose authors have also written books on it, the late Owen Geiger and Kelly Hart) has some posts on building codes. Most of the blog's reports on legal success are about strawbale and cob, but they mention (expensive) engineer approval for earthbags, which is always an option if you can't escape to a free county or need to get cohabitants to trust it.

I remember a documentary on those desert dwellers. Unfortunately, their outcast society precluded cooperating on a decades-long proof of concept like the original tire-rammed earthship. And I guess they were too mobile for earthbags to work.

The late Monolithic Dome Institute guy sparked my imagination with his experiments with basalt roving and reinforcement on small, strong domes that don't take moving tons of soil to build. But even easier, Aircrete Harry plans on building multiple lightweight domes on his property, and he can pour his mix, instead of using a bunch of expensive and fiddly spray equipment. He's living my dream so far. Though before I start sewing together airforms, I want to try slipform or cast aircrete building. These techniques seem like the cheapest, most-effective ways to throw up durable structures, which can be reinforced with a denser mix later for burial (or built on top of a stem wall for partial burial). But all I've done sit back and watch so far.

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dontvisitmyintentions wrote

This was news well over a century ago when the 10th Amendment became the gateway for obliterating intrastate activities, instead of keeping to interstate commerce. It keeps making news, and nothing ever happens.

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dontvisitmyintentions OP wrote

Yes, the trowel will damage the bag. It would work best dumped into a hole or wheelbarrow.

And worse than exposed skin was no dust mask and not enough mix contact with the twisted top of the bag to keep cement from flying off. But that also could be minimized by careful dumping so it captures dry stuff on its way out.

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dontvisitmyintentions wrote

It's very complete, with great links to the unconstitutional laws restricting the right to bear arms, so I hate to complain. But including the age cutoffs with other restrictions makes it seem worse than it is, and harder to use the map at a glance.

If people realized just how close they are to liberty, and just how terrible the non-age restrictions really are, maybe more single-issue gun-rights politicians could make it.

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dontvisitmyintentions wrote

On the other hand, there are a perplexing number of Starlink beta-testers signing up for the service in urban and suburban counties with potentially better options, like Chicago, Seattle, and Minneapolis. Other ISPs should be able to serve those areas without the expense of shooting satellites into the sky.

Local ISPs are vulnerable to local power outages and land prices, unlike all-satellite internet. And I've heard people for years quote phone data bills exceeding their $100/mo fee.

PC Mag authors are easily perplexed, since they got rid of all the knowledgeable contributors a few years ago.

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dontvisitmyintentions wrote

If Chromium is so bad, and it is, why haven't you cleaned it up yet?

Making Chromium a clean, neutral starting point with flags to disable everything for downstream projects (Edge, Brave, Vivaldi, etc) requires Google's cooperation, because Google generates most of the code for their own use in Chrome. Those big names already put money into sustaining it as it is. There's no incentive to make their products easier to be private when downstream doesn't care, either.

Web browsers are too complex for forks to keep up with vulnerabilities and features. Things won't change until some of that complexity goes away. Web sites are too broken for that to happen.

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dontvisitmyintentions wrote (edited )

That patch appears to be part of a set which adds a flag to disable the machine-id feature: https://github.com/brave/brave-core/pull/795

This exchange is informative:

What is the reason for disabling the machine id? We disable the sending of metrics so I'm not sure what the purpose would be. Also, why do you want to disable

I believe they want a portable version where all extensions and passwords are saved between different computers

My impression is that Chromium extensions may rely on machine-id for sync or storage, and this patch works to make sure Brave works without it. I didn't look to see whether machine-id first came from a Chromium source injection into Brave or not.

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